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HANDICAP CHAIR INFORMATION

Handicap Chair Information Form

While it is the policy of the WSGA to mail all materials to the attention of the Handicap Chairperson at the mailing address of the club, we would appreciate you supplying us with your home mailing address on the form below. Also, if your Handicap Chairperson changes, please fill out the form below.

 

Club Number: 20-- *required

Club Name: *required

Chairperson's Name: *required

Mailing Address: *required

City: *required

State: *required

Zip: *required

Home Phone: *required

Daytime Phone:

Your GHIN Number: *required

Your Email: *required

Would you like to receive all your WSGA correspondence via e-mail? *required

Please enter the following characters in the field below: captcha

 

 

Or, click here to download the Handicap Chair Information Form.

(PDF, 352k)

 


 

2017 Handicap System Resource Guide

2017 Handicap System Resource Guide

Download the 2017 Handicap System Resource Guide (PDF, 6M - large file!)

Being the Handicap Chairperson at your club is not an easy position and we greatly appreciate your support. With your efforts, the handicap system is properly administered and creates a fair and equitable environment for all. We have made a significant effort to expand and improve upon previous Pre-Season Packets. We hope you find the information contained within this booklet as a resource guide while administering the USGA Handicap System.

 


 

CLUB LICENSING AGREEMENT

Click here to download the Club Licensing Agreement

(PDF, 380k)

 


 

COURSE RATING INFORMATION

The Washington State Golf Association provides course measuring and rating services to member and non-member clubs on a periodic basis. The goal of the WSGA is to rate each member course every 6-7 years. New clubs (those that have been in existence for less than ten years) or clubs that have undergone a renovation will be rated on a more frequent basis. Non-member clubs must be rated every ten years. This service is provided free of charge to member clubs and for a fee of $1500 per nine holes plus expenses for non-member clubs.

 

HISTORY OF COURSE RATING

Whether it was the expected score that it would take to win "The Belt" at Prestwick in 1870 or the expected score of Colonel Bogey in the 1890's, most of the course rating systems developed before the turn of the century were based on par.

The first USGA Course Rating System was developed in 1911 and was, like the systems developed in the British Isles, par based. The first USGA Course Rating System was based on the play (expected score) of US Amateur Champion, Jerome Travers. Several golf associations made refinements to this system over the years and the USGA adopted several of these refinements in 1947. These refinements included rating on a hole-by-hole basis(A Massachusetts GA refinement) and the "fractional par rating method." (A refinement from the Chicago District GA) Since both refinements arrived at approximately the same ratings, golf associations were allowed to use either system In 1963 the USGA introduced a new rating system that used the Massachusetts rating system modified by principles of the Chicago rating system.

In 1971 the first "obstacle rating" procedure was developed by the Southern California GA. In 1977 Lt. Commander Dean Knuth proposed an improved course rating system that involved numerical rating of ten obstacles on each hole. These ratings provided an adjustment to the distance rating of the golf course. Knuth's system was adopted by the USGA in 1981 and became the basis for the USGA Course Rating System that we use today.

 

COURSE RATING PROCEDURE

When a golf course is rated, the rating team will evaluate the overall difficulty of the golf course for two players, the bogey golfer and the scratch golfer. A course rating for each golfer is determined during the rating process. The course rating for the scratch golfer will become the USGA Course Rating for the golf course. While the bogey course rating is not normally known by the member club, it is an important factor in determining the USGA Slope Rating for the club.

During their visit the rating team will evaluate the ten obstacles and effective length corrections on every hole. They do not play the course during this portion of the visit. The team has the option of playing the golf course either before or after the actual rating process in order to gain further insight into the overall difficulty of the golf course.Upon completion of the rating visit, the data is inputted into a software program to come to a set of preliminary ratings. The preliminary ratings are then forwarded to the Course Rating Review Committee for their review. The Course Rating Review Committee is made up of the most experienced volunteers on the Course Rating Committee and selected staff. Upon their approval, the ratings are released to the club.

 

BASIC DEFINITIONS

In order to help you better understand the course rating process, listed below are some of the basic definitions used in the course rating process:

  • Bogey Golfer - A player with a USGA Handicap Index of 17.5 to 22.4 strokes for men and 21.5 to 26.4 for women. Under normal situations the male bogey golfer can hit his tee shot 200 yards and can reach a 370-yard hole in two shots. Likewise, the female bogey golfer can hit her tee shot 150 yards and can reach a 280-yard hole in two shots. Players who have handicaps in the bogey golfer ranges, but who are unusually long or short off the tee are not considered to be a bogey golfer for course rating purposes.
  • Scratch Golfer - An amateur player who plays to the standard of the stroke play qualifiers competing in the United States Amateur Championship. The male scratch golfer hits his tee shots an average of 250 yards and can reach a 470-yard hole in two shots. The female scratch golfer can hit her tee shots an average of 210 yards and can reach a 400-yard hole in two shots.
  • USGA Course Rating - An evaluation of the overall difficulty of the golf course under normal course and weather conditions for the scratch golfer. This figure is equal to the average of the better half of a scratch golfers scores.
  • Bogey Course Rating - An evaluation of the overall difficulty of the golf course under normal course and weather conditions for the bogey golfer. The bogey rating is equal to the average of the better half of a bogey golfers scores.
  • USGA Slope Rating - The USGA's mark that indicates the measurement of the relative difficulty of a course for players who are not scratch golfers compared to the Course Rating. The lowest Slope rating is 55 and the highest is 155. A golf course of standard playing difficulty has a USGA Slope Rating of 113. If a course has a high Slope rating, it is relatively more difficult for the average golfer than a course with a low Slope Rating. The USGA Slope Rating is a mathematical measurement of how "proportionately" more difficult a set of tees is for those golfers who are not scratch golfers as opposed to the scratch golfers. The greater the difference in the two ratings, the higher the Slope Rating.
  • USGA Slope Rating = (Bogey Course Rating-USGA Course Rating) x 5.381 for men or 4.24 for women. While many have been conditioned to equate the USGA Slope Rating to the overall difficulty of a golf course, it is not the whole factor. In fact, to really determine the overall difficulty of a golf course you must first compare USGA Course Ratings. A golf course with a USGA Course Rating of 69.0 is less difficult for all golfers than one rated at 71.0 even if they have the same Slope Rating. Since they both have the same USGA Slope Rating (125), they both have the same difference between the scratch and bogey golfers, 23.2 stokes. Even though both courses have a Slope rating of 125, the bogey golfer on the course rated at 69.0 will average 92.2 in his best 10 scores while his counterpart on the course rated at 71.0 will average 94.2 If all golf courses had the exact same USGA Course Rating, the course with the highest USGA Slope Rating would be the most difficult course on which to score. But since all courses do not have the same USGA Course Rating, you must evaluate both the Course and Slope Rating, to determine which course is the most difficult on which to score. It is highly possible that you may have a course that has a lower USGA Slope Rating than another course, yet is more difficult to score on because its USGA Course Rating is higher than that of the higher Sloped course.
    The Course Rating for either the scratch or bogey golfer is determined by adding the yardage rating to the obstacle stroke value for that golfer.
  • Scratch Yardage Rating (Male) = (Scratch male effective playing length/220) + 40.9
  • Scratch Yardage Rating (Female) = (Scratch female effective playing length/180) + 40.1
  • Bogey Yardage Rating (Male) = (Bogey male effective playing length/160) + 50.7
  • Bogey Yardage Rating (Female) = (Bogey female effective playing length/120) + 51.3
  • The effective playing length for each golfer is derived by adding the measured yardage of the course to any adjustments made for elevation, roll, forced lay-ups, wind, and altitude. Adjustments are made to the measured yardage if there is any elevation change from tee to green (elevation), if there is a prevailing wind and is it a factor (wind), if the fairway landing areas are hard or soft or if the tee shots land into an upslope or on a downslope (roll), if an obstacle or combination of obstacles prevent a golfer from playing a full length shot (forced lay-up), and if the course is located more than 2000 feet above sea level (altitude).
  • The obstacle stroke value is a numerical evaluation of all obstacles (topography, fairway, green target, recovery and rough, bunkers, out of bounds, water, trees, green surface, and psychology) on the golf course. It is also highly probable that the Obstacle stroke value of the two golfers will be different. Generally, the nearer the obstacles are to the landing zones the higher the rating values.
  • Topography - A factor of how mounds and slopes affect the stance or lie in the fairway landing zone and whether the shot to the green is uphill or downhill.
  • Fairway - A measurement of the probability of hitting the fairway.
  • Green Target - A measurement of the probability of hitting the green from the fairway landing zones. The relationship between the length of shot played and size of the green determines these values. (i.e., long shots to small greens will generate higher values than short shots to large greens)
  • Recovery and Rough - A measurement of the probability of missing the tee shot landing zone or green, and the difficulty of recovering if either is missed.
  • Bunkers - A measurement of the effect bunkers have on play based upon their proximity to target areas and the difficulty of recovery.
  • Out of Bounds - A measurement of how much the out of bounds will come into play based upon the proximity of the boundary to the fairway landing zone or green.
  • Water Hazards - A measurement of how much the water will come into play based upon its proximity to the fairway landing zone or green.
  • Trees - A measurement of how trees effect the play of the two players based upon the size and density of the trees, their distance from the center of the fairway or green, the difficulty of recovering from the trees, and the length of the hole.
  • Green Surface - A measurement of the difficulty of a green from a putting standpoint. Speed of the green and surface contouring are the main factors.
  • Psychology - A measurement of the cumulative effect of the other nine obstacles.

When the Slope Rating for your course changes, the change may also affect your Home Course Handicap. The Slope Rating change may also have a small effect on the computation of your USGA Handicap Index. It may also change the handicap a visitor will use when playing your course.

Another point that cannot be stressed too strongly is the fact that WE RATE FOR ALL GOLFERS PLAYING UNALTERED USGA RULES OF GOLF AT ALL TIMES, ON ALL COURSES. We do not consider "PREFERRED LIES" or "WINTER RULES" or any local club rules, which are contrary to the Rules of Golf.

We are constantly reviewing and updating our Course Rating lists to see how past ratings compare to current ratings and how courses compare as to yardage, rating obstacle stroke values, USGA Course Rating and USGA Slope Rating. We also review all major tournament results that we are provided and compare both gross and net scores with our ratings. When we note anything amiss, we immediately put that course on the schedule for re-rating.

We are sincerely hopeful that this explanation answers any questions you may have had regarding the difference between course and Slope rating. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact the WSGA office at 206-526-8605. We will make every effort to assist you.


 

HOW TO GET A HANDICAP INDEX

Establishing a Handicap Index

A golfer must belong to a golf club to obtain a USGA Handicap Index. Golf clubs that belong to the Washington State Golf Association (WSGA) receive USGA Handicap Indexes computed by the Golf Handicap and Information Network (GHIN).

Once you join a golf club, the club will assign you a GHIN number. Your GHIN number is unique and can follow you to any club or association that is on the GHIN system. You can use your GHIN number to post scores at your home course and at other courses that are on the GHIN system. When you post as a guest at other courses, your scores are routed back to your home club using your GHIN number.

If you have belonged to a club in the past and had a GHIN number, be sure to give that information to your new club. GHIN retains golfer records for 24 months after a golfer has been deleted. So, even if you have not been a member for a year, GHIN will still have your score history and you won't have to start over to establish a handicap.

The WSGA has 24 handicap revisions per year (the 1st and 15th of every month) to update your score history and Handicap Index. Players can begin posting scores March 1st and the final day of score posting is November 14th. Handicap cards can be printed from the handicap computer at your home club, or you can provide GHIN your e-mail address and receive an eRevision with a print copy of your Handicap Card every revision (click here to sign up for eRevision). This card will show your Handicap Index and last 20 score history.

Join or renew your membership online, or call the WSGA office at (206) 526-8605

 


 

HANDICAP SYSTEM AND YOU

Handicap System Terminology
  • Active Season
    An active season is the period of time, determined by the authorized golf association having jurisdiction in a given area, during which scores made there will be accepted for handicap purposes.
  • Adjusted Gross Score
    Adjusted gross score is a player's gross score adjusted under USGA Handicap System procedures for unfinished holes, conceded strokes and holes not played, or not played under the principles of the Rules of Golf, or adjusted under Equitable Stroke Control. (See Section 4.)
  • Authorized Golf Association
    An authorized golf association is a golf association that has jurisdiction and has been licensed by the USGA to issue USGA Handicap Indexes and/or USGA Course and Slope Ratings in its state, district or region through its golf clubs.
  • Course Handicap
    A Course Handicap is the USGA's mark that indicates the number of handicap strokes a player receives from a specific set of tees at the course being played to adjust his scoring ability to the common level of scratch or 0-handicap golf. For a player with a plus Course Handicap, it is the number of artificial strokes the player gives to adjust his scoring ability to the common level of scratch or 0-handicap golf. A Course Handicap is determined by applying the player's USGA Handicap Index to a Course Handicap Table or Course Handicap Formula. (See Section 10-4.) A player's Course Handicap is expressed as a whole number of strokes.
  • Course Handicap Table
    A Course Handicap Table is a chart that converts a USGA Handicap Index to a Course Handicap based on the USGA Slope Rating for the set of tees played. (See Sections 3-3, 8-2d and 10-4.)
  • Course Rating
    USGA Course Rating is the USGA's mark that indicates the evaluation of the playing difficulty of a course for scratch golfers under normal course and weather conditions. It is expressed as strokes taken to one decimal place, and is based on yardage and other obstacles to the extent that they affect the scoring ability of a scratch golfer. (See Section 13.)
  • Eligible Tournament Score
    An eligible tournament score is a tournament score made either within the last 12 months or within the player's current 20 score history.
  • Equitable Stroke Control
    Equitable Stroke Control (ESC) is the downward adjustment of individual hole scores for handicap purposes in order to make handicaps more representative of a player's potential scoring ability. ESC sets a maximum number that a player can post on any hole depending on the player's Course Handicap. ESC is used only when a player's actual or most likely score exceeds his maximum number based on the table in Section 4-3.
  • Golf Association
    A golf association is an organization of golf clubs governed by amateur golfers, operated under bylaws and formed for the purpose of conducting competitions for amateur golfers, and otherwise promoting the best interests and conserving the true spirit of the game of golf in a district, region, or state.
  • Golf Club
    A golf club is an organization of at least ten individual members*that operates under bylaws with committees (especially a handicap committee) to supervise golf activities, provide peer review, and maintain the integrity of the USGA Handicap System (see Club Compliance Checklist, Section 8-2m and Decision 2/7). A golf club must be licensed by the USGA to utilize the USGA Handicap System. A club can obtain a license directly from the USGA or in conjunction with its membership in an authorized golf association that is already licensed by the USGA and that has jurisdiction in the geographic area that includes the principal location of the golf club. (See Appendix F.)

    Members of a golf club must have a reasonable and regular opportunity to play golf with each other. They must be able to return scores personally, and these scores must be readily available for inspection by others, including, but not limited to, fellow members and the club's Handicap Committee.

  • A golf club is one of three (3) Types:
  • Type 1. The members of a Type 1 club are located at a single specific golf course with a valid USGA Course Rating and Slope Rating where a majority of the club's events are played and where the club's scoring records reside; or
  • Type 2. The members of a Type 2 club are affiliated, or known to one another, via a business, fraternal, ethnic, or social organization. The majority of the club members had an affiliation prior to organizing the club; or
  • Type 3. The members of a Type 3 club had no prior affiliation and a majority of the recruiting and sign up of the membership is done by solicitation to the public (e.g. newspaper, Internet).
    *Note: For administrative reasons, some authorized golf associations may require a golf club to have more than the USGA minimum of ten members in order for the golf club to be a member of the authorized golf association.
  • Gross Score
    A gross score is the number of actual strokes plus any penalty strokes taken by a player.
  • Handicap Committee
    A Handicap Committee is the committee of a golf club that ensures compliance with the USGA Handicap System, including peer review. A majority of the Handicap Committee must be members of the club. Club employees may serve on the Handicap Committee, but an employee may not serve as chairman. Any club using the USGA Handicap System is required to have a Handicap Committee.
  • Handicap Differential
    A Handicap Differential is the difference between a player's adjusted gross score and the USGA Course Rating of the course on which the score was made, multiplied by 113, then divided by the USGA Slope Rating from the tees played and rounded to the nearest tenth. Handicap differentials are expressed as a number rounded to one decimal place, e.g., 12.8.
  • Handicap Index
    A USGA Handicap Index is the USGA's mark which is used to indicate a measurement of a player's potential scoring ability on a course of standard playing difficulty. It is expressed as a number taken to one decimal place, and is used for conversion to a Course Handicap. (See Section 10.)
  • Handicap-Stroke Hole
    A handicap-stroke hole is a hole on which a player is entitled to apply a handicap stroke or strokes to his gross score. (See Sections 9-3a and 17.)
  • Inactive Season
    An inactive season is the period of time determined by the authorized golf association having jurisdiction in a given area during which scores made there will not be accepted for handicap purposes.
  • Most Likely Score
    A most likely score is the score a player shall post for handicap purposes when he starts but does not complete a hole or is conceded a stroke. The most likely score consists of the number of strokes already taken plus, in his best judgment, the number of strokes that the player would need to complete the hole from that position more than half the time. This number may not exceed the player's Equitable Stroke Control limit. (See Section 4-3.)
  • Par
    Par is the score that an expert golfer would be expected to make for a given hole. Par means errorless play under ordinary weather conditions, allowing two strokes on the putting green. (See Section 16.)
  • Peer Review
    Peer review is the process of providing a reasonable and regular opportunity for members of a golf club to play golf with each other, and providing access to scoring records and USGA Handicap Indexes for inspection by fellow members and the club's Handicap Committee.
  • Penalty Score
    A penalty score is a score posted by the Handicap Committee for a player who does not return a score or otherwise does not observe the spirit of the USGA Handicap System. (See Section 8-4b(iv).)
  • Preferred Lies (Winter Rules)
    Preferred Lies (Winter Rules) is a local rule that may be adopted by the Committee in the event of adverse conditions that are so general throughout a course that improving the lie of the ball in a specified way would promote fair play or help protect the course. (See Rules of Golf, Appendix I; The USGA Handicap System manual, Section 7)
  • Scoring Record
    A scoring record is a file composed of the most recent 20 scores posted by a player, plus any eligible tournament scores, along with appropriate USGA Course Ratings, Slope Ratings and dates.
  • Slope Rating
    USGA Slope Rating is the USGA's mark that indicates the measurement of the relative difficulty of a course for players who are not scratch golfers compared to the Course Rating (i.e., compared to the difficulty of the course for scratch golfers). The lowest Slope Rating is 55, and the highest is 155. A golf course of standard playing difficulty has a USGA Slope Rating of 113. (See Section 13.)
  • Stipulated Round
    The stipulated round consists of playing the holes of the course in their correct sequence unless otherwise authorized by the Committee. The number of holes in a stipulated round is 18 unless a smaller number is authorized by the Committee. The Committee may, for the purpose of settling a tie, extend the stipulated round to as many holes as are required for a match to be won. (See Rules of Golf, Definitions and Rule 2-3.)
  • Tournament Score
    A tournament score is a score made in a competition organized and conducted by a Committee in charge of the competition. The competition must identify a winner(s) based on a stipulated round(s), and must be played under the principles of The Rules of Golf. Using the above definition as a guideline, the Committee in charge of the competition shall determine in advance if these conditions are met, and announce in advance whether the score shall be identified by the letter "T" when posted. Routine events, such as regular play days, normally are not to be designated as T-scores because they are not significant in the traditions, schedules, formats, and membership of the club. Nine-hole scores are not to be designated as T-Scores. Examples of inter-club competition scores that should be posted as tournament scores when they meet the above conditions are: team matches, competitions restricted by age, member-guest competitions, qualifying rounds for city, state and national competitions, and competitions conducted by golf associations. Examples of intra-club competition scores that should be posted as tournament scores when they meet the above conditions are: low gross-low net competitions, four-ball match- or stroke-play competitions, Stableford competitions, and club championships which are stroke or match play, scratch or with handicap.
  • Trend Handicap
    A trend handicap is an unofficial estimate of a handicap, which may include unreviewed scores since the previous revision and might not be based on the current scoring record. The trend is not an official handicap and should not be used in formal competition. Use of trend is not recommended by the USGA.
  • USGA Handicap System
    The USGA Handicap System is the USGA's mark which denotes the USGA's method of evaluating golf skills so that golfers of differing abilities can compete on an equitable basis.

 

POST WHERE YOU PLAY

A convenience of GHIN is being able to post where you play. GHIN associations throughout the nation share a common database that allow you to post where you play and have that score routed back to your home club.

For those associations that are not on GHIN, a network is available to route scores between handicap vendors. For example, if you play in Southern California, you can post your score as a guest to the International Golf Network (IGN) and that score will be sent to GHIN and will ultimately be routed back to your club in the WSGA. Following is a list of associations that participate in the IGN:

 

Alberta British Columbia Delaware Hong Kong
Louisiana Michigan Ontario Wisconsin

 

ACCEPTABLE SCORES

1) Match Play and Best-Ball Scores

I. Holes played and completed:
Record score for each hole played and completed.

II. Holes played, but not completed:
If you do not complete a hole, record the score you most likely would have made, You're most likely score can not exceed your maximum allowable ESC score.

III. Conceded Strokes:
When a hole is conceded, the score for handicap purposes will be the number of strokes taken, plus one for the concession OR the number of strokes you MOST LIKELY would have taken in finishing the hole--not to exceed your maximum allowable ESC score.

IV. Holes not played:
If you stop the match play round because one competitor has already won, record PAR plus any strokes you have coming on the remaining holes. You must, however, play at least 13 holes in order for the score to be posted as an 18-hole "Tournament" score.

2) Nine Hole Rounds
Non-consecutive nine-hole rounds must be posted. Two nine-hole rounds will be combined and posted to a golfer's record identified with a "C". Seven holes must be played in order for a nine-hole round to be an acceptable score for handicap purposes.

 

TEMPORARY TEES AND GREENS

The guidelines for posting scores when temporary greens and/or tees are in use are as follows: If the use of temporary greens and/or tees is due to course reconstruction and will last for an extended period of time, the golf club should obtain a new course rating from the WSGA Office.

If, however, the use of temporary greens and/or tees is due to seasonal turf conditions which change from day-to-day, scores should be posted for handicap purposes to the normal course rating and Slope rating if the following criteria are met: (1) the Rules of Golf can be followed during this time period (i.e., no automatic two putts, no oversized holes); (2) the effective playing length of the course remains intact (i.e., loss of yardage from temporary tees and greens offset by less than normal roll).

If the Rules of Golf cannot be followed, the score to be posted for that hole is par plus any handicap strokes to be received on that hole which is in accordance with Section 4-2 of the USGA Handicap System manual. If a majority of holes on the course cannot be played in accordance with the Rules of Golf, scores shall not be posted. If the Rules of Golf can be followed but the effective playing length is altered, please notify the WSGA Office at 206-526-8605 or 800-643-6410.

 

THE PITFALLS OF "WINTER RULES"

Specific guidelines regarding preferred lies policies, more commonly referred to as "winter rules," can now be found in Appendix I of The Rules of Golf. This is done in an effort to provide consistency during the inactive, or non score-posting, season. The WSGA encourages clubs to consider the following when deciding whether or not to implement "winter rules":

  • Such a Local Rule conflicts with The Rules of Golf and the fundamental principle of playing the ball as it lies.
  • "Winter rules" are sometimes adopted under the guise of protecting the course when, in fact, the practical effect is just the opposite — they permit moving the ball to the best turf, from which divots are then taken to injure the course further.
  • "Winter rules" tend generally to lower scores and Handicap Indexes, thus penalizing players in competition with players whose scores are made without preferred lies.
  • Extended or indiscriminate use of "winter rules" will place players at a disadvantage when competing at a course where the ball must be played as it lies.

In addition, the WSGA rates all golf courses in accordance with The Rules of Golf. "Winter rules", or any other Local Rules, are not taken into consideration.

The WSGA strongly discourages the use of "winter rules" or "preferred lies", except under extreme circumstances.

 

USGA HANDICAP FORMULA

Handicap Differentials
Handicap differentials are computed by determining the difference between the adjusted gross score (after, applying ESC) and the USGA Course Rating, multiplying the difference by 113, dividing the resulting figure by the USGA Slope rating and rounding off to the nearest tenth.

 

Example #1: Adjusted gross score 95
(Slope=125) USGA Course Rating -71.5
Differential 23.5
Handicap Differential (23.5*113)/125 = 21.2

 

 

 

Example #2: Adjusted gross score 95
(Slope=100) USGA Course Rating -71.5
Differential 23.5
Handicap Differential (23.5*113)/100 = 26.6

 

The 10 lowest differentials of the 20 most recent acceptable scores are selected and totaled. This figure is then multiplied by .096 and all numbers after the tenths digit are deleted (do not round off to the nearest tenth).

 

 

Adj. Score USGA
Course
Rating
Score
Minus
Rating
USGA
Slope
Rating
Handicap
Differential
Adj.
Score
USGA
Course
Rating
Score
Minus
Rating
USGA
Slope
Rating
Handicap
Differential
90 70.1 19.9 116 19.4 90 70.1 19.9 116 19.4
91 70.1 20.9 116 20.4 92 752.3 19.7 123 *18.1
94 72.3 21.7 123 19.9 85 68.0 17.0 107 *18.0
88 70.1 17.9 116 *17.4 78 68.7 9.3 105 *10.0
89 70.1 18.9 116 18.4 82 70.1 11.9 116 *11.6
90 72.3 17.7 123 *16.3 84 70.1 13.9 116 *13.5
91 72.3 18.7 123 *17.2 94 72.3 21.7 123 19.9
91 70.1 20.9 116 20.4 93 72.3 20.7 123 19.0
91 70.1 20.9 116 20.4 89 72.3 16.7 123 *15.3
86 68.7 17.3 105 18.6 88 70.1 17.9 116 *17.4

*10 lowest differentials
Total of 10 lowest handicap differentials -- 154.8
Total multiplied by .096 -- 14.861
Delete all numbers after the tenths digit -- 14.8
USGA Handicap Index equals -- 14.8

Fewer than 20 Scores Available
A USGA Handicap Index shall not be issued to a player with fewer than five scores. When at least 5 but fewer than 20 acceptable scores are available, the formula for determining a USGA Handicap Index is as follows:

 


 

EQUITABLE STROKE CONTROL

The ESC procedure sets a maximum score that a golfer can post for handicap purposes on any hole. The maximum number depends on the golfer's course handicap. Comparing each score to par is no longer necessary, so there's no need to worry about the number of scores you can reduce to a certain level. The accompanying table tells you the maximum score you can post for any one hole.

 

18-HOLE
COURSE HANDICAP
9-HOLE
COURSE HANDICAP

MAXIMUM SCORE POSTED ON ANY HOLE

9 or less 4 or less

Double Bogey

10 through19 5 through 9

7

20 through 29 10 through 14

8

30 through 39 15 through 19

9

40 and above 20 and above

10

 

18-HOLE EXAMPLE: If a player has a Course Handicap of 25, he or she can post, for handicap purposes, a maximum hole score of eight on any hole. There would be no limit to the number of eights that this player could take.

9-HOLE EXAMPLE: If a player has a Course Handicap of 13, he or she can post, for handicap purposes, a maximum hole score of eight on any hole. There would be no limit to the number of eights that this player could take. This new ESC procedure is independent of par.

EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2000

 


 

SCORE POSTING FAQs

 

Did you know?

That the preferable method of posting scores is to post them as soon as practicable at the golf course where the round was played. Any other method of posting (Posting via the Internet, posting the score at your course when you next play, etc.) should be secondary options of score posting not the first.

 

How do I post scores at a golf course other than my home course?

You would choose the Guest/IGN Score Posting Option, enter your GHIN number, select Post Score and then enter your round information to have your posted score transmitted to GHIN and then routed back to your club.

 

Can I post my score at a club that doesn't use GHIN as its handicap computational service?

Yes, you would choose the Guest Score Posting Option, choose the Washington State Golf Association from the list of participating golf associations and then enter your score information which will be routed back to your home club. Your score will be transmitted to GHIN through a service called the International Golf Network (IGN). The WSGA pays a yearly fee to the IGN so that our members can use this service when needed.

 

Did you know?

That an 18-hole score needs to be posted if you play 13 or more holes. If you play 7 to 12 holes you need to post a nine-hole score. Any hole not played should be recorded as par plus any handicap strokes you are entitled to for that hole. This score should be preceded by an "X".

 

Do I have to use Equitable Stroke Control (ESC)?

For handicap purposes, all scores including tournament scores are subject to the use of ESC. This required procedure reduces high hole scores in order to make handicaps more representative of a player's "potential" ability. There should be an ESC chart by all of the WSGA Handicap System computers.

 

What should I do if my score gets posted twice or I post an incorrect score?

Contact the Handicap Chairperson of your club, or if you need their contact information please contact the WSGA Handicap department at 1-800-643-6410.

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